Naan

Naan (pronounced: non) is a traditional Indian flatbread that is really really delicious.  It’s a yeast bread, so prepare for the process to take much of the day (not all hands-on).

Buttered and ready to be eaten.

Yield: about 10  5″ diameter naan

Time:  about 1 1/2 hours hands on, 3 hours total

Ingredients:

  • 1 cup warm water (110°-115°F, if you like to be exact)
  • 1 tablespoon yeast
  • 1/4 cup sugar
  • 3 tablespoons milk
  • 1 egg
  • 2 teaspoons salt
  • 3 cups flour, plus more for kneading and rolling out
  • 1/4 cup butter, melted

    Ingredients

Mix together the water and yeast and let them sit for about 10 minutes to foam.  Add the sugar, milk, egg, and salt to the yeast and mix it gently.  Stir in the flour, about 1 cup at a time, until it starts to pull away from the bowl.

Pulled away from the bowl.

Flour a counter top.  Turn the dough out and knead it for 6-8 minutes, or until it reaches that perfect state of kneadedness-  click here  to see what that looks like.

Pretty nice, I think.

Oil a bowl and place the dough in the oil, swishing it around to coat the dough completely.

Oiled

Let it raise, covered, for 1-2 hours, or until it is done- see the link above to test doneness.

Divide the dough into equal parts (about 10) and roll them into balls.  Place balls on a floured counter top to rest while you prepare your baking surface.

These balls were oiled to keep them moist while I prepared my griddle.

Online there were many methods of baking listed, the most traditional bread resulting from using a very hot baking stone in a very hot (500°F) oven.  Another method involved a cast iron frying pan and lid on the stove top. I use an electric griddle because I don’t enjoy opening and closing my hot oven that often (burn my eyeballs out!) and because the griddle more evenly heats than the stove top.  Some recommend using a grill (I assume stove top grills, not the outdoor kind)  Whichever way you choose, make sure it is hot, consistent, and ideally, can cook more than one at a time.

Flour your surface and roll out the balls about 1/4 inch thick, maybe less.  Using a hot griddle, I cook the dough circles right away, but you may choose to roll out several, cook them, roll out several, etc.  Use a method that works for you.

Rolled out pretty thin. They puff up as they bake.

Cook them until they are lightly browned on one side, flip them, and lightly brown the other.

These were some of the first I made. And they were not burned, though the pic shows them really dark. Note that the naan in the back is bubbly on top. When flipped, those bubbles will brown and the rest will stay pretty pale.

After cooking each side, brush it with butter.

Perfect.

Repeat until you have cooked all the naan.  Eat them right away for the very tastiest treat, or eat them within a day or two.

Mmmmm…the whole delicious stack.

 

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